ALL Knitwear

Glossary

Glossary

Intarsia

Intarsia is a colorwork technique used to create image-based designs (often called picture knitting). Unlike other pattern methods, there is no limit to the number of colors used in a single row of knitting. The visual result is an overlapping or inlaid effect, enabling more complex motifs. Each new color requires its own spool of yarn, and the labor intensity is directly related to the number of colors in use.

 

This technique requires a special carriage that integrates each individual color into a row of knitting without carrying yarn across the back of the fabric. Before the carriage can pass, each yarn must be laid over the desired needle span. This is a lengthy, manual process which requires a lot of planning and preparation.

“Arrangements” sweaters are made with intarsia, beginning from the hem and working up toward the neckline. The resulting structures are made up of a series of individual units that can be assembled to support a variety of outcomes.

Full Fashioning

Full fashioning is a two-step transfer method used to change the shape of a garment panel by manually moving stitches one or two needles at at time. This technique is preferred because it maintains a consistent edge for joining seams and creates virtually zero waste (unlike cut-and-sew where the garment panels are cut down from a larger piece of fabric). Raised stitches around the neck and armhole are called fashion marks, a visual record showing how stitches move to create more drastic shapes.

 

All sweaters on this site are fully fashioned and linked by hand, an industry standard of quality.

Short-Rowing

Short-rowing is an extremely versatile technique that allows partial knitting of a row to create shaping, 3-D texture, and a wide variety of visual effects. This method usually changes the dimension of the fabric, knitting more rows in some areas than others.

 

“Moments” sweaters are made using short-rowing, knitting partial sections within a main body color to create visual interruptions defined by color, shape, and pattern. The resulting composition is reactive, with each new moment defined by the one that came before.

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